FAQ's

What Do My Kidneys Do?

Your kidneys are bean-shaped organs, each about the size of your fist. They are located near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. The kidneys are sophisticated trash collectors. Every day, your kidneys process about 200 quarts of blood to sift out about 2 quarts of waste products and extra water. The waste and extra water become urine, which flows to your bladder through tubes called ureters. Your bladder stores urine until you go to the bathroom.

front view of urinary tract

The kidneys remove wastes and extra water from the blood to form urine. Urine flows from the kidneys to the bladder through the ureters.

The wastes in your blood come from the normal breakdown of active muscle and from the food you eat. Your body uses the food for energy and self-repair. After your body has taken what it needs from the food, waste is sent to the blood. If your kidneys did not remove these wastes, the wastes would build up in the blood and damage your body.

The actual filtering occurs in tiny units inside your kidneys called nephrons. Every kidney has about a million nephrons. In the nephron, tiny blood vessels called capillaries intertwine with tiny urine-carrying tubes called tubules. A complicated chemical exchange takes place, as waste materials and water leave your blood and enter your urinary system.

At first, the tubules receive a combination of waste materials and chemicals that your body can still use. Your kidneys measure out chemicals like sodium, phosphorus, and potassium and release them back to the blood to return to the body. In this way, your kidneys regulate the body's level of these substances. The right balance is necessary for life, but excess levels can be harmful.

part of the nephron

In the nephron (right), tiny blood vessels intertwine with urine-collecting tubes. Each kidney contains about 1 million nephrons.

In addition to removing wastes, your kidneys release three important hormones:

  • Erythropoietin (eh-RITH-ro-POYeh-tin), or EPO, which stimulates the bones to make red blood cells.
  • Renin (REE-nin), which regulates blood pressure.
  • The active form of vitamin D, which helps maintain calcium for bones and for normal chemical balance in the body.

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Flint Office

G1071 N Ballenger Hwy, Suite 310, Flint, MI 48504
Phone: 810-238-4172 · Fax: 810-238-4153

Hours:

Mon - Fri: 8:30am - 4:30pm     Sat - Sun: Closed

Grand Blanc Office

3615 Genesys Parkway, Grand Blanc, MI 48439
Phone: 810-606-6955 · Fax: 810-606-6958

Owosso Office

802 W King St, Suite O, Owosso, MI 48867
Phone: 989-725-1000 · Fax: 989-729-9693

East Lansing Office

4530 S. Hagadorn Road, Suite B, East Lansing, MI 48823-5304
Phone: 810-238-4172 · Fax: 810-238-4153
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